Povidone Iodine Ointment

For treatment of fungal and bacterial skin infections in animals. When used routinely, helps prevent infection in cuts, scratches, abrasions, and burns. An effective germicidal ointment for cuts and wounds. The treated area can be bandaged or left open.

     The Povidone ointment has many practical uses around horses. I would not recommend this ointment to be used in caring of large cuts or wounds, however for the minor cuts and abrasions it is practical, especially because of the lanolin, which will help in restoration of missing hair. One of the most practical uses of this product I find in hoof care in the prevention of bacteria infestation (imbedding). If the horse stands in a stall “rich” in urine, applying this product to the sole of the hoof can help in the prevention of white line decay of the shod hoof. In the same principals it will help to prevent the same during hot summer months, when the bacteria infestation in the hoof is more frequent and often causing hoof abscesses. Hence, this product could help you in the prevention of bacteria related abscess on account of the iodine, despite the small percentage. The lanolin is also a good hoof conditioner; hence this product can be used in general hoof care.

See VITA-DERM for a stronger version of this product

Manufacturer Label Information

Description:
Antibacterial and ant fungal ointment for wounds, cuts, abrasions. Water-resistant formula adheres to wound to provide long lasting protection even in harsh weather. Contains lanolin as an emollient and protect ant.

Active Ingredients:
Povidone Iodine (1% Titratable iodine) enriched with lanolin.

Directions For Use:
Apply to wound after cleansing and drying. Apply as needed to maintain coverage. May bandage if necessary.

Caution:
For veterinary use only. For deep or puncture wounds, use as directed by veterinarian. Keep out of reach of children.

Storage:
Store at controlled room temperature between 15° - 30°C (59-86°F). Keep container tightly closed when not in use

All my comments are merely my opinions and beliefs gained from 40 years of professional life with horses. All drugs should be used only by the consent of a veterinarian and according to his instructions. A person who is with the horse everyday, should know him better than anyone else.