Alternative Treatment Of Thrush No. 2

 

Photos below shows a case of thrush that I would associate with contracted heals and extensive work on a hard ground. Also the use of a bar shoe without a pad will cause the accumulation of dirt which will result in unnatural and increased constant pressure to the frog when not cleaned daily. This horse spend most of his time outside and out of muddy environment. Another case where the cause of thrush is not caused by wet environment as most folks would have you believed. One can see just how dry the foot actually is.

The "Eye Pad" can prove to be very practical in filling out the cavity.

Please be advised that what ever you do with your horse it is done at your own risk. You need to have certain experience to perform this safely. It is best if you consult a professional or your farrier before trying this form of treatment. 

One needs to know the condition and the level of the thrush. In the presence of a serious infection or inflammation, this may not be the best choice. One needs to exercise his judgment in this case. (click on image to enlarge)

Many folks in various stables have much more work that they can handle. Often in these places the feet of horses are neglected. I can understand why some will not have the time to do the entire procedure as shown in our first alternative treatment of thrush. This page shows the bare minimum that can be applied in treatment of thrush and still produce positive results. 

      In this case, the frog has a  deep crack caused by the thrush going above the coronet band. The area was cleaned out only with hoof pick, removing any small rocks, dirt and debris that may have been stuck in it. A small piece of gauze (Eye Pad) dipped in Reducine was pressed into the crack. (The outward pressure of the gauze will promote healing from the inside out, as well as it will help in contracted heels from getting worse or will even improve them). This packing can be left in the foot for two or three days, depending on the moisture in the environment in which the horse stands, and the conditions of the frog. Then the process is repeated till the crack heals to the point that cannot hold the gauze anymore. After that two or three application of Reducine to the frog per week till the frog is healed. This type of treatment will do the job, while it takes up very little time to do it. Once when the thrush is gone, resume your regular hoof care.

       Please see our first alternative treatment for somewhat better,  but more time consuming treatment.

 

All my comments are merely my opinions and beliefs gained from 40 years of professional life with horses. All drugs should be used only by the consent of a veterinarian and according to his instructions. A person who is with the horse everyday, should know him better than anyone else.